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Japan, the United States, and the Future of World Order

About the Program

The Japan, the United States, and the Future of World Order program at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) explores key issues in internationational relations and the ways in which the evolving nature of world order will affect the relationship between Japan and the United States in the years and decades to come. Through virtual workshops, the program convenes leading experts from the worlds of policy and academia to share their insights in conversation and through submitted papers, and to enrich our understanding of these crucial policy questions. Generously supported by the Government of Japan, this program explores US-Japan relations in global politics and world order by convening international conferences across sectors.

Featured Event

Japan, Europe, the United States, and World Order

More information about our next workshop, "Japan, Europe, the United States, and World Order" (Spring 2022), will be available soon.

Past Events

Japan, the United States, and the Future of World Order

In March 2021, the program hosted its inaugural workshop, “Japan, the United States, and the Future of World Order, a two-day, public conference featuring expert insights from current and former government officials, policymakers, and leading experts in the field. Panelists discussed the relationship between Japan and the United States, the effects of China’s evolving grand strategy, conflict and cooperation on the Korean peninsula, new technologies, the region’s military balance, the increased importance of transnational issues ranging from climate change to global public health, and key issues in the Indo-Pacific in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Following introductory remarks from Professor Francis J. Gavin, Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Dr. Kurt Campbell, Deputy Assistant to the President and Coordinator for Indo-Pacific Affairs on the National Security Council, delivered the keynote address, moderated by the Hon. James B. Steinberg, University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs, and Law at Syracuse University. In his remarks, Dr. Campbell identified five important issue areas for US policy in region: the Biden administration’s emphasis on bipartisanship in foreign affairs, collaboration with allies, aligning on common issues with China and across Asia, concurrent policies for great power competition and existential threats, and the importance of Japan-South Korea relations for the world. “For the first time really in modern history, the Indo-Pacific, Asia, is the dominant theater of activity,” Campbell said. Campbell also emphasized the importance of increasing regional expertise in government and of educational exchange between the US and Japan.

 
Moderated by Professor Saori Katada (University of Southern California), the first panel featured remarks from Professor Yuichi Hosoya (Keio University), Ambassador Robert B. Zoellick (Harvard University). The second panel, chaired by Ms. Emma Chanlett-Avery (Specialist in Asian Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division, Congressional Research Service), featured remarks from Professor Hal Brands (Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies) and Professor Michael J. Green (Georgetown University, Center for Strategic and International Studies). Dr. Zack Cooper (American Enterprise Institute), chaired the third panel featuring Professor Jennifer M. Lind (Dartmouth; Faculty Associate, Harvard University), Ambassador Kenichiro Sasae (The Japan Institute of International Affairs) and the Honorable James B. Steinberg (Syracuse University). The final panel, chaired by Professor G. John Ikenberry (Princeton), featured remarks from Professor Francis J. Gavin (Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies), Professor Satoru Mori (Hosei University), and Professor Mireya Solís (Center for East Asia Policy Studies and Brookings Institution). 

Conference Agenda

Day One
Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Opening

6:30pm to 6:35pm EDT
 
Professor Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS; Inaugural Director, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs

Keynote Discussion

6:35pm to 7:30pm EDT
  • Dr. Kurt Campbell, Deputy Assistant to the President and Coordinator for Indo-Pacific Affairs, National Security Council, The White House
     
  • Moderated by The Honorable James B. Steinberg, University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs, and Law, Syracuse University

Panel 1

7:30pm to 8:30pm EDT
 
"A Certain Kind of Grand Strategy: Japan's Free and Open Indo-Pacific Vision and the U.S.-Japan Relations"
  • Professor Yuichi Hosoya, Professor of International Politics, Faculty of Law, Keio University
"Japan, the United States, and the Future of World Order"
  • Ambassador Robert B. Zoellick, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
     
  • Chair and Commentator: Dr. Saori Katada, Professor of International Relations, University of Southern California Dornsife College

Panel 2

8:45pm to 9:45pm EDT
 
"China's Rise and the Weight of History"
  • Professor Hal Brands, Henry Kissinger Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS; Scholar, American Enterprise Institute
"American and Japanese Maritime Strategic Traditions and the Prospects for a Free and Open Indo Pacific Order"
  • Professor Michael J. Green, Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies; Director of Asian Studies, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University
     
  • Chair and Commentator: Ms. Emma Chanlett-Avery, Specialist in Asian Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division, Congressional Research Service


Day Two
Thursday, March 25, 2021 

Opening

6:30pm to 6:35pm EDT
 
Professor Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS; Inaugural Director, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs

Panel 3

6:35pm to 7:50pm EDT

"The End of the Yoshida Doctrine"
    • Professor Jennifer M. Lind, Associate Professor of Government, Dartmouth University; Faculty Associate, Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies, Harvard University; Research Associate, Chatham House, London
    "Challenges to the Democratic Governance Model and the Role of US-Japan Cooperation"
    • Ambassador Kenichiro Sasae, President, The Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA)
    "Japan and the New World Order"
    • The Honorable James B. Steinberg, University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs, and Law, Syracuse University
       
    • Chair and Commentator: Dr. Zack Cooper, Research Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

    Panel 4

    8:05pm to 9:25pm EDT

    "America, the Future of World Order, and the Problems of Plenty"
      • Professor Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS; Inaugural Director, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs
      "Managing China's Order Contestation: Japan, the United States, and Allied Order Managment"
      • Professor Satoru MoriProfessor, Hosei University
      "Japan's Balancing Act: Interdependence and Economic Security"
      • Dr. Mireya Solís, Director of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies; Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies, Brookings Institution
         
      • Chair and Commentator: Professor G. John Ikenberry, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University 

      Closing

      9:25pm to 9:30pm EDT
       
      Professor Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS; Inaugural Director, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs


      Our Funder

      Generously supported by the Government of Japan, this program explores US-Japan relations in global politics and world order by convening international conferences across sectors.

      About the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs

      The Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs seeks to generate and apply rigorous historical thinking to the most vexing global challenges. The Center is home to distinguished scholars of history and practitioners in foreign policy and international security and aims to bridge the world of ideas and the world of action by bringing together leading thinkers and policymakers.