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World Order after Covid-19 Forum

Global Politics and Governance after COVID-19


Tuesday, June 30 
3:15 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. (EDT) 

PANELISTS

Anne Applebaum
Senior Fellow, Johns Hopkins Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute & Johns Hopkins SAIS; Staff Writer, The Atlantic 

Hahrie Han
Professor and Inaugural Director, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute, Johns Hopkins University

Henry Farrell
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Alina Polyakova, Chair
President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for European Policy and Analysis

Janice Gross Stein
Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto 

PARTICIPANT BIOS


Anne Applebaum
Senior Fellow, Johns Hopkins Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute & Johns Hopkins SAIS; Staff Writer, The Atlantic 

Anne Applebaum is a staff writer for The Atlantic and a Pulitzer-prize winning historian. She is also a Senior Fellow at the SNF Agora Institute and the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, where she co-directs Arena, a research project that investigates disinformation and 21st century propaganda. 

A Washington Post columnist for 15 years and a former member of the editorial board, she has also worked as the foreign and deputy editor of the Spectator magazine in London, as the political editor of the Evening Standard, and as a columnist at Slate and at several British newspapers, including the Daily and Sunday Telegraphs. From 1988-1991 she covered the collapse of communism as the Warsaw correspondent of the Economist magazine and the Independent newspaper. 

Her newest book, Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism, appears in July 2020. 

Her previous books include Red Famine: Stalin’s War on Ukraine, which describes events leading up to the Ukrainian famine of 1932-33; Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956, which describes the imposition of Soviet totalitarianism in Central Europe after the Second World War; and Gulag: A History, which narrates the history of the Soviet concentration camps system and describes daily life in the camps, making extensive use of recently opened Russian archives as well as memoirs and interviews. Red Famine won the Lionel Gelber and Duff Cooper prizes in 2018; Iron Curtain won the 2012 Cundill Prize for Historical Literature and the Duke of Westminster Medal, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Gulag won the Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction in 2004 and was also a finalist for the National Book Award. 

Anne Applebaum is also the co-author of a cookbook, From a Polish Country House Kitchen, and a recently re-published her travelogue, Between East and West: Across the Borderlands of Europe, which describes a journey across Lithuania, Belarus, and Ukraine made just before the break-up of the Soviet Union. 

Over the years, her writing has also appeared in The New York Review of Books, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, the Financial Times, the International Herald Tribune, Foreign Affairs, The New Criterion, The Weekly Standard, the New Republic, The National Review, The New Statesman, The Independent, The Guardian, Prospect, Commentaire, Die Welt, Cicero, Gazeta Wyborcza and The Times Literary Supplement, as well as in several anthologies. 

She has also lectured at Yale, Harvard, and Columbia Universities, as well as Oxford, Cambridge, London, Belfast, Heidelberg, Maastricht, Zurich, Humboldt, Texas A&M, Houston, and many others. In 2012–13 she held the Phillipe Roman Chair of History and International Relations at the London School of Economics. She holds honorary doctorates from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Relations and the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla in Ukraine. 

Anne Applebaum was born in Washington, D.C., in 1964. She graduated from Yale University, and was a Marshall Scholar at the LSE and St. Antony’s College, Oxford. Her husband, Radoslaw Sikorski, is a Polish politician and writer. They have two children, Alexander and Tadeusz.  


Hahrie Han
Professor and Inaugural Director, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute, Johns Hopkins University

Hahrie Han is the Inaugural Director of the SNF Agora Institute, a Professor of Political Science, and Faculty Director of the P3 Research Lab at Johns Hopkins University. From 2015-2019, she was the Anton Vonk Professor of Environmental Politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

From 2005-2015, she was on faculty of the Department of Political Science at Wellesley College and a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Scholar at Harvard University from 2009-2011. She specializes in the study of civic and political participation, social movements, collective action, and organizing, particularly as it pertains to democratic revitalization. 

Her newest book (co-authored with Liz McKenna and Michelle Oyakawa) will be published by the University of Chicago Press in the fall of 2020, entitled Prisms of the People: Power and Organizing in 21st Century America. This book examines the way some grassroots organizations translate the engagement of their people into political power, acting like prisms refracting white light into vectors of power and light. Her previous book, How Organizations Develop Activists: Civic Associations and Leadership in the 21st Century (Oxford University Press, 2014) examines the strategies that the most effective civic associations use to engage activists and develop leaders in health and environmental politics. Another book, Groundbreakers: How Obama's 2.2 Million Volunteers Transformed Campaigning in America (co-authored with Liz McKenna, Oxford University Press, 2014) describes the strategies the 2008 and 2012 Obama campaign used to engage so many grassroots activists in communities across America. Her first book, Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics (Stanford University Press, 2009) examined the ways in which people become motivated to participate in politics, looking particularly at means of engaging underprivileged populations in political action. Hahrie’s other work on participation, movement-building, civic associations, primary elections, and congressional polarization has been published in outlets including American Political Science Review, American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Perspectives on Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Legislative Studies Quarterly, Political Behavior, and elsewhere. Her work was awarded the 2013 Outstanding Academic Publication on Membership Organizations Award by the Institute for Nonprofit Research, Education, and Engagement. 

Hahrie has also been involved in numerous efforts to make academic work relevant to the world of practice, including (most recently): co-founding the Center for Democracy and Organizing; participating in the Social Science Research Council Anxieties of Democracy Participation Working Group; serving on the board of organizations like Citizen University, research4impact, the Scholars Strategy Network, the Climate Advocacy Lab, Citizens Climate Lobby, and others; and, co-founding and co-directing the Project on Public Leadership and Action at Wellesley College. Through her research, she has partnered with a wide range of civic and political organizations and movements around the world, including those in the United States, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere. In all of this work, she seeks to develop the leadership of younger scholars and practitioners, especially women and people of color. 

She also acted as co-convener of a Policy Advisory Committee for the 2008 Obama campaign and served as Chair of the Advisory Committee to the EAC Agency Review Team on the Obama-Biden Transition Team and also as National Issues and Policy Advisor to Senator Bill Bradley’s presidential campaign in 1999-2000.  She received her Ph.D. in American Politics from Stanford University in 2005 and her B.A. in American History and Literature from Harvard University in 1997. She was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow from 2002-2005 and received Stanford University’s Centennial Teaching Award in 2002 and Wellesley College’s Apgar Award for Innovative Teaching in 2006. She is the daughter of Korean immigrants, grew up in Houston, Texas, and currently lives in Baltimore, MD.  


Henry Farrell
Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, George Washington University

Henry Farrell is professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University, 2019 winner of the Friedrich Schiedel Prize for Politics and Technology, and Editor in Chief of the Monkey Cage blog at the Washington Post.

He has previously been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, assistant professor at George Washington University and the University of Toronto, and a senior research fellow at the Max-Planck Project Group in Bonn, Germany.

He works on a variety of topics, including democracy, the politics of the Internet and international and comparative political economy. His first book, The Political Economy of Trust: Interests, Institutions and Inter-Firm Cooperation, was published in 2008 by Cambridge University Press. His second (with Abraham Newman) Of Privacy and Power: The Transatlantic Fight over Freedom and Security, was published in 2019 by Princeton University Press, and has been awarded the 2019 Chicago-Kent College of Law / Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize and the ISA-ICOMM Best Book Award. In addition, he has authored or co-authored 34 academic articles for journals including International Organization, World Politics, Comparative Political Studies and the Annual Review of Political Science, as well as numerous book chapters for edited volumes. 

Professor Farrell is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a non-resident senior fellow and associated researcher at the Conservatoire National des Arts & Métiers Security and Defense Hub, a Foreign Correspondent for Stato e Mercato, co-chair of the Social Science Research Council’s Digital Culture initiative, and an affiliated scholar at Stanford University Law School’s Center for the Internet and Society. He is a co-founder of the popular academic blog Crooked Timber, and also blogs at The Monkey Cage, which is currently hosted at the Washington Post and was winner of the 2010 The Week award for Best Blog. He has written articles for general publications including Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The Financial Times, Foreign Policy, The National Interest, The American Prospect, The Washington Monthly, The Boston Review, The American Interest, Democracy, New Scientist, The Nation, Aeon, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Times Higher Education, and the Australian Academic Supplement among others.  


Alina Polyakova
President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for European Policy and Analysis

Dr. Polyakova is a recognized expert on transatlantic relations with over a decade of leadership experience and deep expertise on European politics, Russian foreign policy, and digital technologies. Before joining CEPA, she was the Founding Director for Global Democracy and Emerging Technology at the Brookings Institution.

Previously, she served as Director of Research for Europe and Eurasia at the Atlantic Council, where she developed and led the institute’s work on disinformation and Russia. 

Dr. Polyakova writes extensively on Russian political warfare, European security, digital authoritarianism, and the implications of emerging technologies to democracies. She is the author of the book, The Dark Side of European Integration, and of a large number of major reports on disinformation and democracy in Europe. She is a frequent contributor to The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, and The Atlantic, and commentator in major media outlets, including Fox News, CNN, and BBC. 

She has held numerous prestigious fellowships, including at the National Science Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Social Science Research Council, and the Fulbright Foundation, among others. She also serves on the board of the Free Russia Foundation and the Institute of Modern Russia and is adjunct professor of European studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). 

Dr. Polyakova holds a Ph.D. and MA in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley, and a BA in Economics and Sociology from Emory University. She is fluent in Russian and German. 


Janice Gross Stein
Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto

Janice Gross Stein is the Belzberg Professor of Conflict Management in the Department of Political Science and was the Founding Director of the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy at the University of Toronto (serving from 1998 to the end of 2014).

She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Ontario and an Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Science. She was awarded the Molson Prize by the Canada Council for an outstanding contribution by a social scientist to public debate.

She has been awarded Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Alberta, the University of Cape Breton, McMaster University, and Hebrew University. Her most recent publication (with Ron Levi) is “Testing Deterrence by Denial: Experimental Results from Criminology,” Studies in Conflict and Terrorism (2021).