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Nina Hall

Assistant Professor of International Relations

About

Nina Hall is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Her core areas of expertise are: international organizations, transnational advocacy, climate adaptation, and global refugee governance. She holds a DPhil (PhD) in International Relations from the University of Oxford and a Master’s Degree from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. She previously worked as a Lecturer at the Hertie School of Governance, and as a policy officer at the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. She is currently writing a book on transnational advocacy in the digital era, to be published by Oxford University Press. She is a co-founder of an independent think tank, New Zealand Alternative, and frequently writes on New Zealand foreign policy.
 
 

Expertise

Regions

  • New Zealand

Topics

  • Climate Change
  • Disruptive Innovation
  • International Relations
  • Politics
  • United Nations
  • Women's Rights

Languages

  • French
  • Italian
  • Spanish
  • German

In the News

H-Diplo teaching roundtable XXII-40 on environmental politics.

Nina Hall participated in Michigan State Department of History roundtable, 05/21

A change of tack in Winston Peters’ wake.

Nina Hall quoted in Newsroom, 02/10

What would a President Joe Biden mean for New Zealand?

Nina Hall wrote in The Spinoff, 11/02

New Zealand economy, trade and China in focus after Ardern triumph.

Nina Hall quoted in Nikkei Asian Review, 10/23

A new approach to social sciences, humanities in a time of crisis

Nina Hall wrote in University World News, 5/7

The role of international relations in the COVID-19 world

Nina Hall interviewed on Radio New Zealand, 4/7

New Zealand and the world.

Nina Hall interviewed on Radio New Zealand, 1/28

Innovation and adaptation in advocacy organizations throughout the digital eras.

Nina Hall wrote in the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 1/19