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Curriculum | DIA

Degree Requirements

  • Students in the 48-credit track (those who have already completed a relevant master’s level degree) must complete 32 credits prior to the final, non-residential thesis year.  Aside from the DIA Methods sequence (DIA Methods I, SA.600.896 and DIA Methods II/ Thesis Development Colloquium SA.600.897), you may ultimately choose any combination of courses that you think supports your specific interests and research agenda.
    • Full-time students (two year track) usually take 16 credits (4-5 courses) per term, inclusive of both DIA Methods I (SA.600.896) in the Fall and DIA Methods II/ Thesis Development Colloquium (SA.600.897) in the Spring.
    • Part-time students in the 48-credit track (three year track) take 8 credits (usually meaning two courses) during each of their first four semesters, taking the DIA Methods sequence (DIA Methods I, SA.600.896 and DIA Methods II/ Thesis Development Colloquium SA.600.897) in their second year (I and Fall and II in Spring). 
       
  • Full-time students in the three-year 80-credit track (those who have not already completed a relevant master’s degree) will adhere to the standard Master of Arts in International Relations (MAIR) program requirements.
    • In the second year, you will take the DIA Methods sequence (DIA Methods I, SA.600.896 in the Fall and DIA Methods II/ Thesis Development Colloquium SA.600.897 in the Spring) for what would otherwise be electives.
    • Students pursuing the three-year track will also be conferred the MAIR degree upon successful completion of the program.

The final year for all students is completed part-time (8 credits of “Thesis” each semester) and does not require residency in Washington DC. During this year, students complete their research and write a doctoral thesis under the guidance of their faculty advisor. The DIA Thesis Year Syllabus will guide you with standardized benchmarks and timeframes.

Faculty Advisors

Since the school’s inception in 1943, the school’s faculty members have been internationally recognized for their scholarship, experience, and quality of teaching. They are award-winning scholars, authors, diplomats, thinkers, and senior-ranking officials who are authorities on international economics and international relations and who have expertise in contemporary issues around the world.

During their course of study, students will work individually with a faculty advisor who will guide them through the doctoral thesis process. The final year is completed on a part-time, non-resident basis allowing students to conduct research, write, and prepare to defend their thesis. DIA advisors may include any Johns Hopkins SAIS faculty scholars or expert practitioners who hold PhD degrees.